Lee Rockey Lee Rockey Music

Type: Album

Release Date: February 26, 2007

Catalog No: RS-IND060

Label: De Stijl

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De Stijl is very pleased to present the first archival digs into the wondrous world of Lee Rockey.

Lee was a hardswinging jazzbo who had mastered the modern style by ’46, and became known as one of the Vancouver whiz kids. He went to the city in ’53, jammed with Neil Hefti, and appeared on the first few Herbie Mann recs (plays Bethlehem BCP-58, east coast jazz / 4 Bethlehem BCP-1018). Upon his left coast return, he began developing his own sound / style, with an intent of transcending traditional musical forms / expectations.

Ju Suk Reet Meate caught one of his performances in early ‘76, and lee became a figure of big inspiration. He’d eventually invite Lee to play on a few early Smegma records. Aside from a few record booth lathes cut in the 40s / 50s, this is his first solo release.

On first spin there are a few brief moments when the sounds of Toshi Ichiyanagi come to mind, but these sounds inhabit a universe that is entirely that of Lee Rockey. Though the pieces contained on this record were recorded from the yrs ’59 to ’73, they own a keen third eye prescience that portends the likes of C Spencer Yeh and Axolotl.

This is far / away the most modern sounding records to ever brandish the De Stijl logo, and you’ll scratch your head until the kingdom comes.

De Stijl is very pleased to present the first archival digs into the wondrous world of Lee Rockey.

Lee was a hardswinging jazzbo who had mastered the modern style by ’46, and became known as one of the Vancouver whiz kids. He went to the city in ’53, jammed with Neil Hefti, and appeared on the first few Herbie Mann recs (plays Bethlehem BCP-58, east coast jazz / 4 Bethlehem BCP-1018). Upon his left coast return, he began developing his own sound / style, with an intent of transcending traditional musical forms / expectations.

Ju Suk Reet Meate caught one of his performances in early ‘76, and lee became a figure of big inspiration. He’d eventually invite Lee to play on a few early Smegma records. Aside from a few record booth lathes cut in the 40s / 50s, this is his first solo release.

On first spin there are a few brief moments when the sounds of Toshi Ichiyanagi come to mind, but these sounds inhabit a universe that is entirely that of Lee Rockey. Though the pieces contained on this record were recorded from the yrs ’59 to ’73, they own a keen third eye prescience that portends the likes of C Spencer Yeh and Axolotl.

This is far / away the most modern sounding records to ever brandish the De Stijl logo, and you’ll scratch your head until the kingdom comes.